How much to pay your cleaners, part 2

My last post about how much to pay your cleaning staff was extremely popular and I got a few follow up questions that I wanted to cover.

How do you reward people who have worked for you for a long time?

I’m actually very averse to paying people more money just because they’ve been here longer than someone else. I’d rather that the person who has been here one year but who is a go-getter and always asking for more work to make more money than a mediocre cleaner who’s been with my company for three years.

Don’t reward the longevity just with money. We actually have an awards ceremony where we give out a watch for people who have been with us for three years, with earrings and other jewelry that they can pick from for other anniversaries. They also get $100 extra on their first anniversary (but this maxes out at $250—I’ve got a business to run!) Having a cake to celebrate the day is also a good way to make them feel special.

I prefer to promote quality, attitude, and responsibility. Those of your staff who have been around for awhile, offer them an additional opportunity. Ask if they’d like to earn more money as a trainer or as a house checker or as a team lead.

How does commission work for big jobs such as first time cleans, move-outs, or spring cleaning? How do you keep your team moving on these big jobs?

This is a great question, because it does seem like everyone slows down when it comes to bigger jobs. This means that we don’t pay them by the hour for these bigger jobs. Let’s say that we have a 9 hour job for a $300 house and 3 people are assigned to the house. If all of them work the same amount of time, getting to the job at the beginning and all leaving together, this works best. Then you can take the $300 and divide by the 3 people working it, so it’s a $100 house for each of them. Then you pay them their commission on that $100 house. Let’s say Sally has a 42% commission rate, so she gets $42 and you keep $42. Sally worked alongside Martina, who earns a 44% commission ($44 for her, $56 for you). And Maria earns 46% commission, so she takes home $46 for the house while you get $54.

This is just a sample of the kind of help I can offer in my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course. My course is a no-holds-barred program to teach you how to get out of the field and what the right way is to add customers and staff quickly. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

How much to pay your cleaners

How much should you pay your cleaners? It’s a question that every cleaning business owner struggles with until they figure out a system that works best for them. You want to pay a wage that will motivate your cleaning staff, prevent turnover, and still make money from your business.

The best way is to pay your cleaners well by giving them a commission, or a percentage of each house that they clean. That said, one thing you want to keep in mind is that your direct labor cost should not exceed 45% of your revenue.

Your goal should be to pay your staff at least $15 an hour on average, and if that makes your eyes pop out, you aren’t charging your clients enough. The going hourly rate for cleaning service across the U.S. and Canada is between $40 and up, per labor hour. Your staff needs to be able to average between $15-18 an hour and you need to still bring in a profit.

Another tactic to increasing your profits without raising rates significantly is to implement Speed Cleaning practices. Let’s say you charged $30/hr for a house that used to take your cleaner 4 hours ($120 total), but then your staff got trained on maximizing their efficiency with Speed Cleaning and now it only takes her 3 hours to clean the house. Now you’re technically charging $40/hr for that house without having to ask the client for a big increase. You don’t always have to raise your rates, especially if you improve the speed of your team. You want to incentivize your staff to hustle.

This system has worked extremely well for my maid service. My staff is well-paid and they don’t turnover like crazy unlike most maid services. I love the result.

Keep your overhead low so you have decent profit margins and so you can pay your employees well. High employee turnover results in higher overhead costs, so in the long run you are saving money by keeping your employees happy. If you think there’s no way you can pay your staff well and still turn a profit, then your margins are off.  Need help with margins, profitability, and path to paying your staff better? Check out my Cleaning Business Fundamentals Course.

Being an entrepreneur can be a lonely business, and very few people can guess their way to success in this business—in fact most people don’t. I highly recommend that you join my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course to get training, strategy, and weekly answers to your burning questions. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

7 questions to ask prospects before giving them a quote

People are busier than ever and some prospective clients seem to only want one thing from you—a quote for the amount you’ll charge. One of the cleaning business owners that I’m coaching said that she frequently gets text messages asking “How much do you charge?”

I recommend that you never text back an amount, but call them back to get the following questions answered. How are you going to know what to quote without knowing more about the situation? Since they sent you a text, you know their phone number, so pick up the phone, give them a call, and introduce yourself. Then get into the details.

Things to ask before providing a cleaning quote

  1. What part of the city do they live in? You want to be sure that you service their particular area before you continue the call.
  2. Is this a one time clean or are they interested in ongoing cleaning? If it’s a hard job and a one time shot, you can quote more for the job than if you’re going to be cleaning on a regular basis.
  3. Ask if they are getting ready for a special event or occasion. Do they need a move out clean? If so, you probably won’t get another shot at cleaning for them and it’ll probably be a bigger effort than a regular clean, so don’t lose money on the job if they’re moving away.
  4. How soon do they need service? If it’s tomorrow, you’ll probably want to add a rush charge. If it’s next week, you have more flexibility with your scheduling and staff and can charge less.
  5. How many square feet is the home? How many bedrooms, bathrooms, people living in the house, and pets do they have?
  6. Do they have hardwood floors?
  7. Any other special circumstances?

The point of this call is to gather enough information so that you can provide a quote that makes sense for your business. Another benefit is that it conveys to the client that there is a whole lot more to cleaning than just how cheap you are. As you go through this list, you show how knowledgeable you are about all the aspects that they wouldn’t even think about.

For example, say it’s a move out clean. You can tell them that if they’re satisfying the requirements of a contract you’ll need to do a complete top to bottom clean, tackling the inside of drawers, washing baseboards and doors and cabinets, hand-cleaning light fixtures, vacuuming the blinds. You go through a list of items that they didn’t even ask for, to let them know what you believe that they need. Suddenly they realize that it’s a much bigger job than just having one person show up with a vacuum tomorrow. They will value your expertise and you can price your services accordingly.

But do not provide a quote until you get what you need out of them. You are not competing on price, so you must get across the feeling that there is a whole lot more involved than just how cheap you are. If I can’t create that impression on the phone, then I’ve lost the job… unless I’m the cheapest. You have a conversation to demonstrate that you really know what you’re talking about. If the customer has been calling around and just getting price quotes from people, they may start to question whether those other services really know what’s involved in their request, because they didn’t ask the detailed questions that you covered.

Let the prospect know all the things that you traditionally do when you provide a particular type of service, whether it’s for them having a party or putting their house on the market or getting everything ready as they prepare to go into surgery. Once you go through your complete list, they know it’s going to be a bigger job than the three hours they had initially thought. The customer is more likely to say yes to your quote after you detail out all the things they didn’t even think of.

This is just a sample of the kind of help I can offer in my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course. My course is a no-holds-barred program to teach you how to get out of the field and what the right way is to add customers and staff quickly. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

How to close more deals and increase revenue

As the owner of your cleaning business, one of your top priorities should be to close more deals and generate enough business to keep your staff busy cleaning. A few weeks ago I covered some tips for low-cost or free marketing ideas. Now that the leads are coming in, how do you close more of them?

The absolute best way to close a deal is to have a conversation with your prospective client. I know that a lot of people are into texting or emailing, but this is not a conversation. If you can’t drop by for an in-home estimate, pick up the phone and speak to the prospect. When you communicate via text or email, it’s normally all about answering the customer’s question about price and you’re unable to get any of your questions answered. They just want to know how much your service costs, and are expecting you to text or email them a number. Don’t do it. Pick up the phone and call them.

You are not competing on price. You are running a professional organization that handles insurance, bonding, training, background screening, supplies, and more. Besides bringing all that to the table, you have skills, knowledge, and experience. When you quote a customer for a job without having a conversation, you are only competing on price, and you won’t win when you go head-to-head against your cheapest competitor.

If the call goes to voicemail, make it clear to the prospect that they will have to speak with you in order to get a quote. As soon as the lead comes in, respond quickly. You can say something like, “I just got your text and I would love to offer you a quote for cleaning services. To give you the best quote, I need to ask you a few questions about your home. You can reach me at 555-5555, or I’ll try you back in a couple of hours. I look forward to speaking with you!”

Prospects don’t get a quote out of me until I get everything I need from them. I know I’m not going to be the cheapest, and I have one shot to convey what it is about my business that is worth the extra cost. I’ll tell them about my experience and let them know all the things that they might need done to their home that they may not have considered. You have to convey that there’s more to cleaning than how cheap you are. If I can’t create that impression on the phone then I’ve lost the job, unless I’m the lowest priced option.

As you gather basic information about the job, articulate what they need and how you’re going to give it to them. You will demonstrate that you really know what you’re talking about, that you are a professional with experience and can be trusted to do the job right. The main thing is to sell them on your VALUE, not on your PRICE.

Tips for closing the sale:

  • Ask for phone number in your lead-generation form. This will be the best way for you to have a conversation to convey the value your business provides. Every page of your website should have a plug to “Get a quote” that asks for phone number, email, and name.
  • When you are speaking to the prospect, always suggest the next step. “When would be the best time for me to check back? Should I give you a call tomorrow once you’ve spoken to your husband about this?” Another good tactic is to suggest a day for service: “I have next Wednesday available and we tend to fill up quickly. Would you like me to hold that slot for you?” Make the appointment while you have them on the phone.
  • If the customer says that they will call you back, you can respond, “No problem. If I don’t hear from you then I’ll just call you next week.”
  • Follow up! When my maid service gets an inbound lead overnight, we call the prospect the next morning at 9am, then at 11am, and then at 2pm if we haven’t reached them. This lets the customer know that you’re not going away, that they’ll need to speak with you in order to get a quote but that you’re very interested in their business.
  • Always leave with some type of commitment, either that you’ll call them the next day or that they’re scheduled for an appointment next week.

Being an entrepreneur can be a lonely business. I highly recommend that you join my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course to get feedback and answers to your questions. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

Marketing 101, with tips for low-cost marketing (or free marketing)

Marketing does not have to be expensive—you can start small. These are some tips around how to get the most out of a tiny marketing budget, and still grow your business.

Start small, invest your profits back into marketing

If all you have is $300, then start there. If that $300 produces a customer, take the profit and put it back into marketing, let’s say up to $450 month, and see how it does. Keep putting the profit you make each month back into marketing and see how quickly marketing pays for itself.

Be strategic and analyze each marketing source’s effectiveness

Remember, you have to be strategic. You can’t just spend money and not answer your phone. Well-placed marketing is worth the investment because there’s a return. When you spend $1000 and get 3 or 4 customers who will use you for a year or longer, it pays for itself. You have to analyze each marketing source you spend money with— is it a weak source, driving low-value customers or none at all? Then cut that source and replace it with a proven source.

Be responsive – answer inbound leads immediately

You need to be sure you’re responsive to your marketing—answer immediately—it’s not going to work if you don’t call prospects back for days or if they can’t ever reach you. With a quick response, you should be able to snag those jobs that your marketing drives to you.

No money? Invest time instead

If you really can’t afford to spend money on marketing you can spend time instead. Sometimes you have more time than money… and sometimes you have neither but you find a way!

Low-cost (or free) marketing ideas

  • Build up your Facebook page and presence, participate in Facebook groups by making recommendations for local restaurants and dialoguing with people on Facebook. It costs you nothing. When the time is right, talk about your service and get the word out.
  • Email marketing is very cheap. It’s not free, but it’s inexpensive. Build your list and communicate to your subscribers with relevant information and offers.
  • Go to networking events and attend local events in your community, like local trade shows or festivals. I had an employee attend a women’s event today— we had our table and signage, which probably cost me $100, and had hundreds of people to come by and engage with my employee.
  • Incentivize a friend to drum up business— give them $20 for each client they send you.
  • Partner affiliate relationships don’t cost you anything but a business card. Leave business cards at local nail salons and restaurants and tell them that for every client they refer, you’ll give the client a $50 gift card for nail treatment or dining out. The partner businesses will be thrilled to promote you because that means money back to them.

This is just a sample of the kind of help I can offer in my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course. My course is a no-holds-barred program to teach you how to get out of the field and what the right way is to add customers and staff quickly. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

 

No excuses – Why your cleaning business is stuck

Last week I was talking to a business owner and was amazed by how many excuses he had for why he couldn’t move his business forward. When I was speaking with him, I realized that he was all about CAN’T, instead of listening to my suggestions or asking how to make a change. I personally don’t understand the word CAN’T—it’s not in my vocabulary. If every problem you have is blamed on other people, or you can’t find a solution because you can’t do something, you are never going to move your business forward.

Here are a few of the excuses he gave me. Do any of these sound familiar? Be honest with yourself, and don’t hold yourself back!

Excuse #1: I can’t pay my employees more and I struggle with high turnover. I pay them all I can afford to pay.

You need to charge your clients more so that you can pay your staff more. No one will want to work for a lower than normal rate. You will always have high turnover if you don’t pay your employees enough.

Excuse #2: I can’t charge more because clients won’t pay higher rates.

When I asked him what his conversion rate was on clients, he said 80%. That’s unusually high, and that tells me that he’s not charging enough. He was shorthanded from all the people quitting who didn’t want to work for him, but he couldn’t service all the demand because he wasn’t charging enough, and had excuses for not charging more. The demand was unusually high, meaning he had wiggle room on prices.

I told him that he needed to do more marketing so that his phone would ring more often and to quote higher prices but to keep his staff busy. “Give your employees more hours and raise their pay—spend more on marketing and your phone will ring more.”

Excuse #3: I can’t spend any money on marketing

I asked how much he was currently spending on marketing and after a bit of calculation, he figured about $500/month. But this wasn’t driving enough work to keep the 5 people who were working for him busy.

So what was wrong with his marketing? I dug a little deeper and found that he’s spending his money in the places that attract customers who want the lowest price (like Thumbtack or Yelp). He’s marketing to the wrong people and spending a lot on low-cost/low-return marketing. It turns out that someone had suggested that he use Google AdWords but he said it was too expensive. What were the results when he tried it? It worked, it did crank out a few customers.

How is marketing expensive if it works? If it generates new customers, it also gives you an opportunity to retain those new customers as recurring clients. That is long-term, permanent money in the bank.

You can’t afford NOT to spend money on marketing. If you don’t, your business will dry up and you’ll be so desperate for customers that you’ll price your services too low.

This is just a sample of the kind of help I can offer in my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

Pricing your maid services

I get a lot of questions about how to price cleanings from maid services. Below are a few that came up recently that I thought you might be interested in.

What if a client needs a deluxe cleaning but doesn’t want to pay for it?

This happens a lot with potential clients, especially people who have never hired a maid service before. When you’re at their home, you can see that they really need a deep clean to set things straight, but they balk at the price tag and ask for just a few hours instead of the six hours that they really need. I recommend that you tell the client that you are committed to getting their house clean and that if they sign up for weekly or bi-weekly cleaning, you will give them a rebate on the price after they’ve had two consecutive cleanings. This way, you give them thorough, high quality service that they’re happy with from the get go, and they’re pleased to get a bit of a discount when they sign up for recurring cleaning.

Do you include tax in your rate?

No, we do not include sales tax in our hourly rate and I suggest that you do the same. This is money that’s going straight to the government, not into your pocket, so layer it on top of your rate. We tell clients that we’re such-and-such a price, plus tax. For example, $40/hour plus tax, or $120 per cleaning plus tax. The tax that you pass along to the state or municipality should not come out of your pocket.

What if I’m losing business because clients have increased price sensitivity?

One of my clients mentioned that competition has become fierce in his area of service and wondered if he was losing prospective customers due to his pricing. He doesn’t want to be the “low price provider” but he feels like something is going on. The best way to handle this situation is to meticulously track your inbound leads and your conversions. You need to track every single inbound call, email, or Facebook message, and then track whether or not they converted to become a customer. Most of us convert 50-60% of inbound inquiries IF (and this is a big two-part ‘if’) we take the call when it comes in and respond immediately and IF you can service them on the day they requested. If you meet these criteria and you’re converted below the 50-60% range, then you might want to adjust prices.

Just tell me what I should charge!   

To figure out what your rate should be, find out exactly what your competition is charging per hour in your area. Ask a “secret shopper” to price all the local professional services to get an idea of what the market rate is. Remember that solo-preneurs who own the business and do the cleaning have almost no overhead and can charge very low hourly rates. If you run a more complex business with overhead costs, employee wages, business insurance, and other expenses, then your prices need to be higher than those of sole practitioners who do their own cleaning.


This is just a sample of the kind of help I can offer in my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course. My course is a no-holds-barred program to teach you how to get out of the field and what the right way is to add customers and staff quickly. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

Also, spots are filling up fast for my June 23 & 24 Speed Cleaning for the Pros session. Reserve your spot today!

Speed cleaning does not mean you sacrifice quality

As you know, I’m a huge fan of speed cleaning as a process. But I get a lot of questions around how speed cleaning fits in with the desire to provide high quality cleaning. I’d like to offer you some thoughts about speed cleaning and clear up some of the confusion around implementing the speed cleaning system.

To grow and scale your business, you need to be able to speed up your staff so that you can have the lowest cost possible for labor (time spent cleaning a home) without sacrificing quality.

Speed cleaning is not the opposite of quality cleaning. Slow cleaning does not ensure quality. Maybe you know this already because you have an employees who spends too long cleaning a house and they still do a crummy job. Speed doesn’t mean quality goes downhill and slow does not guarantee a great clean.

Speed cleaning is a method developed by Jeff Campbell. Follow it step by step to clean and you will achieve speed by following the process. You do not achieve speed by rushing around, hurrying, missing and breaking stuff. Speed comes when you use repetition and the right tools, like the apron to speed you up and not waste time. Speed comes when you’re following the 13 rules of speed cleaning to help you clean faster without sacrificing quality. Speed cleaning doesn’t mean to hurry and rush.

You can save thousands of dollars in payroll when your staff is able to clean a house in 3 hours that used to take them 4 hours. And you’ll gain additional income from all the jobs you used to turn down because you couldn’t fit them into your schedule.

If you’re worried about quality, taking more time to clean won’t guarantee it. Don’t confuse quality with speed.

Another note—speed cleaning is not a marketing term. I never tell a customer that we teach our staff “speed cleaning” but instead mention that we do “perfect maintenance cleaning.” Speed cleaning is an internal term, an internal system and process that you use with your staff to make sure they are properly trained to be thorough and efficient. It’s more likely that your employees will be consistent with their quality if they are using the speed cleaning system.

If you need help implementing speed cleaning processes in your business, here are a few tools that can help:

This is just a sample of the kind of help I can offer in my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

Also, spots are filling up fast for my June 23 & 24 Speed Cleaning for the Pros session. Reserve your spot today!

10 things you can do to be successful

I’m a big fan of Simon Sinek and his book, Start with Why. In it, he calls out the ten rules for success. These are a huge help to me, and I want to share them with you as well and show you how to apply them to your cleaning business’s success.

10 things to focus on for success

  1. Envision success. Some people see what they want to accomplish and others only see the obstacles preventing them from getting what they want. Be the kind of person who can envision exactly what you are going to accomplish.
  2. Train your mind to be excited instead of nervous. Excitement is an emotion that gives energy and nervousness takes energy away. This is really great advice for when you’re speaking to a group.
  3. Be patient. Nothing happens overnight. For example, I had a client who was afraid to invest money in her training, but after she took my class, she was so excited. The next day, she wanted to implement everything, all at once. But you must be patient; you can’t implement changes overnight without possibly damaging existing business processes and relationships.
  4. Take accountability. Realize that sometimes YOU’RE the problem. Why do you keep having so many lazy employees and flaky clients? You might be the reason. Swallow your pride and fix what needs to be addressed in your own behavior.
  5. Outdo yourself. I love this one. Compete with yourself, not your competition. Focus on you, your business, your marketing strategies, and your presence. Forget the competition. It’s good to know what they’re doing and what they’re charging, but focusing on them too much will hold you back.
  6. Stack the deck in your favor, and work from a position of strength. I like speaking at places where I am the best speaker in the room about my topic. I want to market my business in places where I know it will resonate with my customers. I want to attract people who are interested in what we are good at.
  7. Be the last one to speak. I’ve had to work on this my whole professional career—when you’re the boss it’s hard to keep your mouth shut. I’ve gotten better over the years but I’m still working on it. When you let other perspectives weigh in before you share your own thinking, you get a broader range of opinions. Invite your staff to suggest solutions. Wait until they comment and provide feedback before you chime in.
  8. Be authentic. Be who you are and be real. Let your brand reflect who you are. You’ll attract people who resonate with the real you. If you’re faking it, you’ll attract people who won’t appreciate your business once your identity emerges. Identify your core brand values, figure out what you want to be, and let the right people come to you.
  9. Find your passion (as long as it works). This is the only suggestion that you should take with a grain of salt. “Find your passion” can be a bunch of baloney. You’ve got to follow what works. You might be passionate about something, but it isn’t helping your business succeed. Sometimes passion alone isn’t enough. What you need is tenacity and hard work along with passion.
  10. Start with the why. Understand why people buy from you and hire your business. Why do they really like doing business with you? Why do they care about your company? For the maid service that I own, our customers do business with us because we make it as painless, easy, and hassle-free as possible. Our customers are busy and they just want someone to handle it all for them. So we make sure we keep providing that, day-in and day-out.

This is just a sample of the kind of help I can offer in my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course. My course is a no-holds-barred program to teach you how to get out of the field and what the right way is to add customers and staff quickly. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

Also, spots are filling up fast for my June 23 & 24 Speed Cleaning for the Pros session. Reserve your spot today!

How To Calculate The Cost Of Poor Training

business woman blowing money away|Corporate Training| Lewisville TXDo you ever wonder “where on earth does all my money go?”  It’s like a leak in the bucket of profitability that you can never seem to plug.  What is the cause, and how do you plug that leak once and for all?

Everyone who knows me, knows I’m a NUMBERS FREAK!  I always ask “how does the data support that?” before I endorse a change someone wants to make.  Whether it’s a coaching client suggesting a solution to a problem they are having, or an employee from one of my companies that has a great idea.  I always ask:   “What do the numbers say?”  “SHOW ME THE NUMBERS!”    I’ve learned over the years that the numbers never lie and they always tell a story.  If you want to know what it’s actually costing you in terms of dollars and cents to continue to run your business with a weak or non existent training program, consider these real factors:

3.75 Hours – If a team of three cleans 5 jobs today, and they waste 15 minutes per job due to a lack of well-defined cleaning strategies and processes, that equates to 3 hours and 45 minutes of totally wasted productivity TODAY.  Here’s how that was calculated:

  • 15 minutes per job wasted X 5 jobs = 75 minutes per person
  • 75 minutes wasted per person X 3 in a team = 225 min. (divide that by 60 min. and you get 3.75 hours of lost productivity for the day and extra wages paid)
  • If your team of 3 wastes 15 min. per job 5 days a week, that’s 18.75 wasted hours per team per week
  • Payroll Cost – If you pay each member of the team $12 per hour, then you’ll fund an extra $225 a week in unnecessary wages PLUS worker’s comp and payroll taxes for that one team.
  • Monthly Cost – is up to $974.25 (+ payroll taxes) for one team
  • Annual Cost – is over $12,000.  Again, “extra wages” per team

What if your team actually wastes an hour per day per person, due to inefficient cleaning times?  That cost is now 4X and is up to $48,000 in extra payroll expense FOR ONE TEAM!  Uh-Oh, you have three teams??????????????

Here’s the problem, we get so focused on ALL THE REVENUE our staff is generating that we fail to pay attention to where all the profit is leaking out.  There are many reasons why a company could be losing profits, but training is one of the big ones.

Now, let’s do this in REVERSE and end on a much more positive note, lest you close this email and begin sobbing

uncontrollably into your hands!

If a team of three could increase their productivity by just 15 minutes per job (and most could improve more) here’s what you could do with all that extra productivity without even hiring one more person:

  • You could sell another 3.75 hour job per day, per team!  If your rates are approximately $40 an hour that’s an extra $150 in revenue you could say “yes” to rather than “so sorry, we are booked up for today, how about tomorrow?”
  • If you did that every day, your team would generate an extra $750 in revenue for the week, and that’s 100% profit for those who pay hourly because they got the extra job done in the same amount of time they used to spend doing one less job.
  • Repeat that 5 days a week, 52 weeks a year and your team brought an extra $39,000 in revenue and SAVED you that $48,000+ in extra payroll expense
  • Oh!  You have 3 teams?    We’ll now you’re net gain is……. too much for me to calculate!

Yes, these figures are accurate.  If you have 10 or more hourly paid cleaners, the cost or savings to your company is over the roof top!  Of course you might not add one full job per day per team for 52 weeks.  I get that.  But, for many these numbers are not extreme, they are EYE OPENING!

So………what were you saying about not wanting to spend the money to send your entire admin staff and trainers to the Speed Cleaning Conference in June?  ………….. you’re welcome!