How to get things done

When you’re an entrepreneur, you’ve got a million things that you need to deal with. So how do you make the most of your day? It’s all about time management and prioritization. And remember —“Done is better than perfect.” Let go of your tendency to achieve perfection so that you get more done.

Most of us are busier than we should be. So how do you get more of the important things done in your day? You have to focus on the most important task on your to-do list and do it. Successful people don’t do everything… they just do the most important things. People ask me how I’m able to do it all and the secret is that I don’t. I just do the highest priority things.

Make a list every day of the important things you need to do. For most of us, our lists are ridiculously long. Successful people do the right things. Make your list, then circle three things on the list that you absolutely must do today. Maybe that is to place a help wanted ad to fill an open position, maybe that’s to follow up with all first time customers today or return voicemails that came in overnight. (Returning calls from potential customers should be at the top of your priority list). Decide on the top three things that will move your business forward today.

This forces you to make a choice. Without circling the top 3, when you look at a list of 25 things you’ll do the things that are easy or that you like to do. So circle your “must-dos” and then do them.

Apply your time and attention to the things you need to do every day to reach your ultimate goal.


This is just a sample of the kind of help I can offer in my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course. My course is a no-holds-barred program to teach you how to get out of the field and what the right way is to add customers and staff quickly. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

How to handle customer complaints

As a business owner, you are committed to providing high-quality service and when customers complain, it’s going to sting a bit. So how do you handle dealing with customer complaints in a way that is productive for you and your business? Shake it off!

To quote one of my favorite movies (You’ve Got Mail!), it’s not personal, it’s business.

It’s not possible to please everybody, so there will be a small handful of customers who will tell you that your team didn’t do a good job. You’ve got to develop a thick skin, because it’s not personal, it’s business. You are not a failure if you get a complaint.

Even if 99.9% of customers are happy with our service, we tend to focus on the 0.01% of people who aren’t happy instead of feeling good about the 99.9% who say we do an amazing job. We focus on the negative when we take things personally.

You have to realize that everything is a numbers game. If you clean more houses, you’re going to get more complaints. You might see 1 complaint for every 10 houses you clean. My advice? Get over it, and move on.

Here’s another way to look at complaints: every piece of negative feedback is a gift, not a failure. You can learn from the feedback and determine what went wrong and what could have been cleaned better. If you find that the customer was just off their rocker and nothing was wrong with the clean, there’s no reason to be upset—that customer is just unreasonable. But if there was a bit of truth in each complaint, take that feedback as a gift and realize that this will help you not make the same mistake in the future.

When you speak with the unhappy client, do not defend your team’s work or make excuses for why you disappointed them. Don’t try to convince them that they are wrong. Take the high road, say “I’m so sorry you were disappointed. Can we come back this afternoon and correct it for you?”

I’m all about eating crow. Apologize, offer to fix it quickly, and swallow your pride. You never know what response you may get.

Most of your customers think you’re awesome. so quit focusing on the negative, and see what you can do to make it right.

Bonus tip: to de-stress, find a song you really like, play it loud, and dance for a few minutes. Literally shake it off. Then move on. Don’t let complaints spoil the joy of your business.

Need more tips on training? Check out my Cleaning Business Fundamentals Course. Being an entrepreneur can be a lonely business, and very few people can guess their way to success in this business—in fact most people don’t. I highly recommend that you join my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course to get training, strategy, and weekly answers to your burning questions. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

Why do most people fail? Or, how to achieve focus

Why do most people fail at starting a business? I know it’s a bit of a negative concept, but it’s true. 95% of startups fail within their first five years. The majority of people who start a business end up failing and not reaching the size of business or income they had hoped to achieve.

The truth is, we’re in business to make money, to build wealth and to gain freedom. When you make money, you get more free time. And if you follow certain principles, you are guaranteed to be more successful.

Success is rarely luck. It’s an intentional mindset and strategy that you take in your life. People are not born successful, but it’s something they have to work toward intentionally. Success is available to everyone, but it’s true that some people have to work harder than others. I’ve had to work really hard to be successful, but it’s available to everyone when you follow certain steps.

What’s one of the most important factors to success? Focus.

Now don’t dismiss me out of hand because that’s something that you already know. You know you need to focus, but I’m asking you to read that again and really take it in. You need to be reminded over and over again about the things that drive success, and focus is profoundly responsible for success. Lack of focus is what causes failure.

You have to be hyper-focused on one thing—being the best in the world at what your core business is. Since your business most likely doesn’t service the entire world, you can narrow that down to being the best and most successful maid service in your community. That means providing the best service and leaving homes looking gorgeous and smelling fabulous. It also means having a business that is highly profitable, scalable, with smooth operations and a high quality of life for you, the business owner. You need to have a better business than everyone else—the kind of job that employees want to work at and a business that functions with a decent amount of time from the business owner.

Once you are successful, that’s when you can add on other services and extend your brand. But don’t shift your focus and dilute your attention to go down rabbit holes of other income opportunities while you are building your core business. If you chase two rabbits, you won’t catch either one of them.

Being focused is the best way to succeed and it will help you accelerate the growth of your business.

Here are some things to think about:

  • Be careful about switching around too much. Some people come to me when running a janitorial business who can’t get it to work so they want to switch to residential, or vice versa. It’s not that one is better than the other, but just pick one and do it really well.
  • Don’t be a serial entrepreneur. I hate this term. It’s usually code for not being able to make one business work so you switch to something else. Stick with one thing and build it. The baggage that is keeping you from succeeding in one business will follow you to the next.
  • Don’t try to be everything. This will dilute your focus and confuse your customer. If you try to be all things to all people, you will be nothing in people’s minds. You won’t stand out. Focus on one thing and be amazing at it and better than everybody else.
  • The thing you focus on doesn’t even have to center around cleaning. If you ask people in my community what stands out to them about my maid service, chances are they’ll mention our charitable commitment and outlook. We’re givers, and we give back to the community. What’s the one thing that summarizes you?
  • Distractions are lethal. Don’t allow them to hijack your day. You should have a weekly plan of how to move your business forward that you focus on without allowing other people’s urgent matters to distract you. Your focus should be on how to make more money and grow your business.
  • Do the important things, not the urgent things. Of course, if it’s both urgent and important, you can drop everything to handle it. Otherwise, let someone else deal with it for you. Spend your time in the most productive way for your business.

 

Got it? Good! The key is focus, focus, focus. With that in mind, here are steps that can help you achieve focus:

  1. Decide what you want to do.
  2. Write it down. Create a goal.
  3. Set a deadline for your goal.
  4. Make a list of everything you have to do to achieve that goal and create an action plan.
  5. Take action! Do something every single day that moves you toward your goal.

A lack of focus will guarantee that your business will not be as big as it could have been.

This is just a sample of the kind of help I can offer in my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course. My course is a no-holds-barred program to teach you how to get out of the field and what the right way is to add customers and staff quickly. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

The Maid Coach Raises $10,000 For Hurricane Harvey Victims

While 60 inches of rain were soaking Houston, Debbie Sardone knew that cleaning businesses in the area were going to need help recovering from the devastation. As a top cleaning business development expert based a few hundred miles away in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, Debbie has spent years helping owners grow their cleaning companies into highly profitable enterprises. She jumped into action and offered her most popular training course, Cleaning Business Fundamentals, at half price and donated 100 percent of the proceeds from the first six programs sold to help Houston-area cleaning businesses. Within 24 hours, she raised $10,000 to go directly to maid services that were affected by the hurricane.

“The money is helping these businesses to clean up their locations, replenish their stock of damaged supplies, make payroll, and keep their business running while they regroup after this tragedy,” said Debbie.

She was thrilled by the response of cleaning business owners across the U.S. and Canada who were eager to take her training course and to donate to those impacted by the hurricane. “They got to transform their own business while helping out another business— a win-win for all,” Debbie said.

In addition to offering her Cleaning Business Fundamentals course, Debbie will also be hosting many cleaning business owners in January 2018 at the Speed Cleaning for the Pros conference. She is passionate about helping other business owners find ways to maximize their revenue, retain superstar employees, attract top paying clients, and grow their companies.

This hurricane relief effort to Houston-based maid services shows how much sympathy she has for companies struggling to recover from the disaster. The Houston maid services helped by her effort were incredibly touched but not surprised by Debbie’s action.

“She has such a big heart and cares about helping companies succeed. That feeling comes through everything Debbie does,” one owner said.  Another business owner who received some of the funds said, “Thank you so very much. You have no clue how much I truly appreciate this.”

How to train your cleaners

You absolutely have to nail training in order to have a successful business. I can help you improve your training program or implement a program if you don’t have one in place. You need to stop winging it, and start making little changes starting today.

Step 1: Do you have the right new hire?

Training your cleaners is not just about teaching someone how to clean— it’s about identifying whether you hired a rock star or made a mistake in hiring, and then it’s about teaching them.

You’ve got to teach your trainers what to look for. Anyone can put their best foot forward in a job interview, but your trainers are your eyes and ears. Find out what the new employee is like out in the field with their trainer. They think they’re working with a peer, but they’re not, because your training supervisor is an extension of management. Teach your trainers to identify whether you made a hiring mistake after a few days of working with them in the field.

Trainers can alert you to serious problems like drug or alcohol abuse. Is the new employee coming to work stoned or drunk, or are they someone who might steal or who brags about selling pills on the black market. Clearly identify that this is part of the trainer’s job, otherwise they may feel like they’re being a snitch by telling on the new hire. Tell your trainer that you are looking for serious ethical issues that will help you know if you hired the right person.

Step 2: Learn the Speed Cleaning method

Training should focus on improving a few key things: skill and efficiency. The system that has been most successful for my business is Speed Cleaning. This is an internal term; we don’t tell our clients that we train our cleaners to be speed cleaners, we tell them our staff is professionally trained. Speed Cleaning does not mean rushing or hurrying. Speed simply means that someone is fast. You can achieve speed by being efficient; speed is not a dirty word like rushing or hurrying. Your cleaners will be fast because they have a method and routine that they follow. They don’t waste time, which is why they’re fast. Working slowly doesn’t guarantee they’re going to clean better than a person who is quicker.

Speed Cleaning is a method, not a result. There is a formula to follow and train your staff. If you don’t have your own method, you can come up with one or just use the tried-and-true Speed Cleaning method that Jeff Campbell invented many years ago. No one else has put a method together that’s more effective as a fast way to do a top to bottom maintenance cleaning.

Step 3: Focus on technique and less on results

When you implement a training program, you should focus mainly on the trainee’s technique and less on the end results. For example, to focus on results would be to ask the trainee to clean a mirror without streaks and a surface clear of dust. By focusing on technique, we tell them exactly how we want it done. “This is how we clean: we take a microfiber cloth, spritz two sprays onto the cloth, start at the top and work back and forth all the way down.“

Most of your trainers are probably teaching result instead of technique because that’s all they know. When you have a training program, they’ll know the exact technique to use to work efficiently and effectively. Focus on exactly how to do it, step by  step.

To do this, give your new employees a tangible guide, either one you create or the Speed Cleaning for the Pros guide. Give them a guide, let them watch DVDs about the process, and give them a week in the field to work out the technique.

Don’t forget that trainers need to be taught how to teach. Tell them to follow the process and not cut any corners. If you don’t teach them how to train, they’ll just show the trainee how to clean, which does not guarantee speed.

Step 4: Training should be SMART

You’ve heard of SMART goals, right? Your training should be SMART, too. That stands for:

Specific – give specific instruction about what to do. “Make sure no dust is on the table” is not specific. Better to say: “Pick up each item, spray on the cloth, use the cloth to wipe the table.”

Measurable – measure the trainee’s performance at the end of the week with an evaluation form that measures speed, quality, attitude, ability to follow instructions. Have a list of specific things you can measure so that at the end of the training period, you have something in writing that allows you to make a decision on whether you hired a problem child or a rockstar.

Achievable and Realistic – the goals you set for training should be realistic. People get demoralized by goals that are not achievable. Perfection is not possible.

Timebound – your trainee should complete training in about a week. Sometimes people need two weeks. If it’s taking 3-4 weeks then there’s probably a lot of practice that is going on. One to two weeks is all it takes to get someone trained if you have a proper training system in place.

Step 5: Other considerations and questions

You should meet with your trainers often and help them hone their training skills. Don’t just hand them a guide and leave them alone, they need coaching as well.

Here are a few questions I’ve received about training:

How do you turn excellent supervisors into amazing trainers?

You should incentivize your trainers. Sometimes people who are really good at cleaning aren’t naturally trainers. Don’t just give them a raise for being a trainer, or bonus them just during training. Roll this out as a promotion, make it an honor and a privilege with solid compensation. Put into writing what you expect of them, that their responsibility is to follow the system you’ve outlined. My company also has a regular trainers’ meeting where we order in pizza and discuss all things training. People support what they help build.

Is a trainer capable of training two or three people at a time?

If your trainer normally works in teams of two, showing two or three new people the ropes is stressful and none of those new trainees will get individual training. I prefer to give individual one-on-one training for new hires.

Need more tips on training? Check out my Cleaning Business Fundamentals Course. Being an entrepreneur can be a lonely business, and very few people can guess their way to success in this business—in fact most people don’t. I highly recommend that you join my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course to get training, strategy, and weekly answers to your burning questions. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

How much to pay your cleaners, part 2

My last post about how much to pay your cleaning staff was extremely popular and I got a few follow up questions that I wanted to cover.

How do you reward people who have worked for you for a long time?

I’m actually very averse to paying people more money just because they’ve been here longer than someone else. I’d rather that the person who has been here one year but who is a go-getter and always asking for more work to make more money than a mediocre cleaner who’s been with my company for three years.

Don’t reward the longevity just with money. We actually have an awards ceremony where we give out a watch for people who have been with us for three years, with earrings and other jewelry that they can pick from for other anniversaries. They also get $100 extra on their first anniversary (but this maxes out at $250—I’ve got a business to run!) Having a cake to celebrate the day is also a good way to make them feel special.

I prefer to promote quality, attitude, and responsibility. Those of your staff who have been around for awhile, offer them an additional opportunity. Ask if they’d like to earn more money as a trainer or as a house checker or as a team lead.

How does commission work for big jobs such as first time cleans, move-outs, or spring cleaning? How do you keep your team moving on these big jobs?

This is a great question, because it does seem like everyone slows down when it comes to bigger jobs. This means that we don’t pay them by the hour for these bigger jobs. Let’s say that we have a 9 hour job for a $300 house and 3 people are assigned to the house. If all of them work the same amount of time, getting to the job at the beginning and all leaving together, this works best. Then you can take the $300 and divide by the 3 people working it, so it’s a $100 house for each of them. Then you pay them their commission on that $100 house. Let’s say Sally has a 42% commission rate, so she gets $42 and you keep $42. Sally worked alongside Martina, who earns a 44% commission ($44 for her, $56 for you). And Maria earns 46% commission, so she takes home $46 for the house while you get $54.

This is just a sample of the kind of help I can offer in my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course. My course is a no-holds-barred program to teach you how to get out of the field and what the right way is to add customers and staff quickly. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

How much to pay your cleaners

How much should you pay your cleaners? It’s a question that every cleaning business owner struggles with until they figure out a system that works best for them. You want to pay a wage that will motivate your cleaning staff, prevent turnover, and still make money from your business.

The best way is to pay your cleaners well by giving them a commission, or a percentage of each house that they clean. That said, one thing you want to keep in mind is that your direct labor cost should not exceed 45% of your revenue.

Your goal should be to pay your staff at least $15 an hour on average, and if that makes your eyes pop out, you aren’t charging your clients enough. The going hourly rate for cleaning service across the U.S. and Canada is between $40 and up, per labor hour. Your staff needs to be able to average between $15-18 an hour and you need to still bring in a profit.

Another tactic to increasing your profits without raising rates significantly is to implement Speed Cleaning practices. Let’s say you charged $30/hr for a house that used to take your cleaner 4 hours ($120 total), but then your staff got trained on maximizing their efficiency with Speed Cleaning and now it only takes her 3 hours to clean the house. Now you’re technically charging $40/hr for that house without having to ask the client for a big increase. You don’t always have to raise your rates, especially if you improve the speed of your team. You want to incentivize your staff to hustle.

This system has worked extremely well for my maid service. My staff is well-paid and they don’t turnover like crazy unlike most maid services. I love the result.

Keep your overhead low so you have decent profit margins and so you can pay your employees well. High employee turnover results in higher overhead costs, so in the long run you are saving money by keeping your employees happy. If you think there’s no way you can pay your staff well and still turn a profit, then your margins are off.  Need help with margins, profitability, and path to paying your staff better? Check out my Cleaning Business Fundamentals Course.

Being an entrepreneur can be a lonely business, and very few people can guess their way to success in this business—in fact most people don’t. I highly recommend that you join my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course to get training, strategy, and weekly answers to your burning questions. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

7 questions to ask prospects before giving them a quote

People are busier than ever and some prospective clients seem to only want one thing from you—a quote for the amount you’ll charge. One of the cleaning business owners that I’m coaching said that she frequently gets text messages asking “How much do you charge?”

I recommend that you never text back an amount, but call them back to get the following questions answered. How are you going to know what to quote without knowing more about the situation? Since they sent you a text, you know their phone number, so pick up the phone, give them a call, and introduce yourself. Then get into the details.

Things to ask before providing a cleaning quote

  1. What part of the city do they live in? You want to be sure that you service their particular area before you continue the call.
  2. Is this a one time clean or are they interested in ongoing cleaning? If it’s a hard job and a one time shot, you can quote more for the job than if you’re going to be cleaning on a regular basis.
  3. Ask if they are getting ready for a special event or occasion. Do they need a move out clean? If so, you probably won’t get another shot at cleaning for them and it’ll probably be a bigger effort than a regular clean, so don’t lose money on the job if they’re moving away.
  4. How soon do they need service? If it’s tomorrow, you’ll probably want to add a rush charge. If it’s next week, you have more flexibility with your scheduling and staff and can charge less.
  5. How many square feet is the home? How many bedrooms, bathrooms, people living in the house, and pets do they have?
  6. Do they have hardwood floors?
  7. Any other special circumstances?

The point of this call is to gather enough information so that you can provide a quote that makes sense for your business. Another benefit is that it conveys to the client that there is a whole lot more to cleaning than just how cheap you are. As you go through this list, you show how knowledgeable you are about all the aspects that they wouldn’t even think about.

For example, say it’s a move out clean. You can tell them that if they’re satisfying the requirements of a contract you’ll need to do a complete top to bottom clean, tackling the inside of drawers, washing baseboards and doors and cabinets, hand-cleaning light fixtures, vacuuming the blinds. You go through a list of items that they didn’t even ask for, to let them know what you believe that they need. Suddenly they realize that it’s a much bigger job than just having one person show up with a vacuum tomorrow. They will value your expertise and you can price your services accordingly.

But do not provide a quote until you get what you need out of them. You are not competing on price, so you must get across the feeling that there is a whole lot more involved than just how cheap you are. If I can’t create that impression on the phone, then I’ve lost the job… unless I’m the cheapest. You have a conversation to demonstrate that you really know what you’re talking about. If the customer has been calling around and just getting price quotes from people, they may start to question whether those other services really know what’s involved in their request, because they didn’t ask the detailed questions that you covered.

Let the prospect know all the things that you traditionally do when you provide a particular type of service, whether it’s for them having a party or putting their house on the market or getting everything ready as they prepare to go into surgery. Once you go through your complete list, they know it’s going to be a bigger job than the three hours they had initially thought. The customer is more likely to say yes to your quote after you detail out all the things they didn’t even think of.

This is just a sample of the kind of help I can offer in my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course. My course is a no-holds-barred program to teach you how to get out of the field and what the right way is to add customers and staff quickly. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

How to close more deals and increase revenue

As the owner of your cleaning business, one of your top priorities should be to close more deals and generate enough business to keep your staff busy cleaning. A few weeks ago I covered some tips for low-cost or free marketing ideas. Now that the leads are coming in, how do you close more of them?

The absolute best way to close a deal is to have a conversation with your prospective client. I know that a lot of people are into texting or emailing, but this is not a conversation. If you can’t drop by for an in-home estimate, pick up the phone and speak to the prospect. When you communicate via text or email, it’s normally all about answering the customer’s question about price and you’re unable to get any of your questions answered. They just want to know how much your service costs, and are expecting you to text or email them a number. Don’t do it. Pick up the phone and call them.

You are not competing on price. You are running a professional organization that handles insurance, bonding, training, background screening, supplies, and more. Besides bringing all that to the table, you have skills, knowledge, and experience. When you quote a customer for a job without having a conversation, you are only competing on price, and you won’t win when you go head-to-head against your cheapest competitor.

If the call goes to voicemail, make it clear to the prospect that they will have to speak with you in order to get a quote. As soon as the lead comes in, respond quickly. You can say something like, “I just got your text and I would love to offer you a quote for cleaning services. To give you the best quote, I need to ask you a few questions about your home. You can reach me at 555-5555, or I’ll try you back in a couple of hours. I look forward to speaking with you!”

Prospects don’t get a quote out of me until I get everything I need from them. I know I’m not going to be the cheapest, and I have one shot to convey what it is about my business that is worth the extra cost. I’ll tell them about my experience and let them know all the things that they might need done to their home that they may not have considered. You have to convey that there’s more to cleaning than how cheap you are. If I can’t create that impression on the phone then I’ve lost the job, unless I’m the lowest priced option.

As you gather basic information about the job, articulate what they need and how you’re going to give it to them. You will demonstrate that you really know what you’re talking about, that you are a professional with experience and can be trusted to do the job right. The main thing is to sell them on your VALUE, not on your PRICE.

Tips for closing the sale:

  • Ask for phone number in your lead-generation form. This will be the best way for you to have a conversation to convey the value your business provides. Every page of your website should have a plug to “Get a quote” that asks for phone number, email, and name.
  • When you are speaking to the prospect, always suggest the next step. “When would be the best time for me to check back? Should I give you a call tomorrow once you’ve spoken to your husband about this?” Another good tactic is to suggest a day for service: “I have next Wednesday available and we tend to fill up quickly. Would you like me to hold that slot for you?” Make the appointment while you have them on the phone.
  • If the customer says that they will call you back, you can respond, “No problem. If I don’t hear from you then I’ll just call you next week.”
  • Follow up! When my maid service gets an inbound lead overnight, we call the prospect the next morning at 9am, then at 11am, and then at 2pm if we haven’t reached them. This lets the customer know that you’re not going away, that they’ll need to speak with you in order to get a quote but that you’re very interested in their business.
  • Always leave with some type of commitment, either that you’ll call them the next day or that they’re scheduled for an appointment next week.

Being an entrepreneur can be a lonely business. I highly recommend that you join my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course to get feedback and answers to your questions. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.

Marketing 101, with tips for low-cost marketing (or free marketing)

Marketing does not have to be expensive—you can start small. These are some tips around how to get the most out of a tiny marketing budget, and still grow your business.

Start small, invest your profits back into marketing

If all you have is $300, then start there. If that $300 produces a customer, take the profit and put it back into marketing, let’s say up to $450 month, and see how it does. Keep putting the profit you make each month back into marketing and see how quickly marketing pays for itself.

Be strategic and analyze each marketing source’s effectiveness

Remember, you have to be strategic. You can’t just spend money and not answer your phone. Well-placed marketing is worth the investment because there’s a return. When you spend $1000 and get 3 or 4 customers who will use you for a year or longer, it pays for itself. You have to analyze each marketing source you spend money with— is it a weak source, driving low-value customers or none at all? Then cut that source and replace it with a proven source.

Be responsive – answer inbound leads immediately

You need to be sure you’re responsive to your marketing—answer immediately—it’s not going to work if you don’t call prospects back for days or if they can’t ever reach you. With a quick response, you should be able to snag those jobs that your marketing drives to you.

No money? Invest time instead

If you really can’t afford to spend money on marketing you can spend time instead. Sometimes you have more time than money… and sometimes you have neither but you find a way!

Low-cost (or free) marketing ideas

  • Build up your Facebook page and presence, participate in Facebook groups by making recommendations for local restaurants and dialoguing with people on Facebook. It costs you nothing. When the time is right, talk about your service and get the word out.
  • Email marketing is very cheap. It’s not free, but it’s inexpensive. Build your list and communicate to your subscribers with relevant information and offers.
  • Go to networking events and attend local events in your community, like local trade shows or festivals. I had an employee attend a women’s event today— we had our table and signage, which probably cost me $100, and had hundreds of people to come by and engage with my employee.
  • Incentivize a friend to drum up business— give them $20 for each client they send you.
  • Partner affiliate relationships don’t cost you anything but a business card. Leave business cards at local nail salons and restaurants and tell them that for every client they refer, you’ll give the client a $50 gift card for nail treatment or dining out. The partner businesses will be thrilled to promote you because that means money back to them.

This is just a sample of the kind of help I can offer in my 16 week Cleaning Business Fundamentals course. My course is a no-holds-barred program to teach you how to get out of the field and what the right way is to add customers and staff quickly. For a free 30 minute consultation to discuss whether my course is a good fit for you, simply fill out my owner’s survey and I’ll be in touch to set up a time to talk.